June 17, 2015

Kaine Marks Third Anniversary Of DACA, Calls For Passage Of Comprehensive Immigration Reform

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In remarks on the Senate floor today, U.S. Senator Tim Kaine marked the third anniversary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and called on his congressional colleagues to work together to pass comprehensive immigration reform legislation. Since the program was announced in 2012, DACA has offered temporary relief from deportation to over 660,000 immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as young children, including nearly 10,000 who call Virginia home. Kaine highlighted the stories of two Virginians enrolled in the DACA program, making the case that communities across the Commonwealth have benefited from the economic and educational opportunities made available to these young adults.

“The DACA program announced by the President has allowed young people to contribute to our communities, live without constant fear of deportation, keep families together and provide economic and educational opportunities for these young recipients,” said Kaine. “[DREAMers] didn't come here of their own volition, they were brought here. They only know Virginia as home and they seek to study, work and build a life in this country as proud Virginians. They want to return the opportunities afforded to them by using their talents to improve their communities and make it a better place for everybody.”

“We are now almost exactly two years from the date when the Senate passed comprehensive immigration reform right here on this floor in June of 2013,” Kaine continued. “Two years, where after a strong bipartisan effort, we’ve waited for action - any action - by the House. Not just taking up our bill, but their own bill, and in a conference finding a compromise, which we can do. It's time that the House act. It's time that the Senate and House sit down together and do comprehensive immigration reform. We can give DREAMers and millions of other families who continue to live in the shadows an earned pathway to citizenship. It's time to pass that reform.”

Full transcript of Kaine’s remarks:

Thank you, Mr. President. I rise today to mark the third anniversary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program which was this week. Since 2012, the program that the President implemented, which has been known as DACA, has offered temporary relief from deportation to immigrants who arrive to the United States as young children. And it's helped almost 665,000 young people since June of 2012, including more than 10,000 in Virginia. 

The DACA program announced by the President has allowed young people to contribute to our communities, live without constant fear of deportation, keep families together and provide economic and educational opportunities for these young recipients. I want to thank President Obama and the administration because DACA has provided relief to thousands of youngsters who seek only to pursue opportunity, provide for their families and contribute to the only places that they've ever known as home: the United States.

Immigrants aren't the only ones who benefit. DACA enforces the universal reputation of this country that we're proud of, that we value our immigrant heritage and we embrace and celebrate their contributions to American history, industry and culture. And, Mr. President, this is a value that is something that we feel very deeply in Virginia, and we feel it more every day. When I was born in 1958, one out of 100 Virginians had been born in another country. Today in 2015, one out of nine Virginians was born in another country, and that period coincides with the moving of the Virginia economy from bottom quarter per capita income to top quarter. Immigration and the contributions of immigrants to our state have been tremendously positive. There are 10,000 youngsters in Virginia; more than 10,000 benefited by DACA. We're 13th among all states.

Let me tell you two quick stories. Hareth Andrade exemplifies what DACA recipients – if given the opportunity – can give back to their communities. Hareth arrived to the United States from Bolivia, brought by adults – she arrived without her parents. She excelled in school; she attended Washington Lee High School in Arlington. She took Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate classes. During a campus visit before she graduated she learned for the first time her undocumented status would be a barrier to earning a college education. But instead of giving up on her dream, she organized with other students to form Dreamers of Virginia, an organization that has led efforts to provide students access to in-state tuition and college admission for kids just like her. After the President announced the DACA program in June of 2012, Hareth became a recipient and has since transferred from community college to Trinity Washington University where she expects to graduate with a degree in international relations next year.

Another student, just one more story, Jung Bin Cho also has seen doors open to him because of DACA, like the fine institution Virginia Tech where he now attends. Cho arrived in the United States with his parents from South Korea when he was seven years old. He attended elementary school, graduated high school in Springfield, Virginia and played on the defensive line for the football team. His dream -- a lot of Virginians have this dream -- was attending Virginia Tech and he gained admission to the school. But at that time he first realized that his undocumented status eliminated him from in-state tuition or any financial aid. Because he couldn't afford it, he attended community college and worked two jobs to support himself. But following DACA and the decision last year to grant in-state tuition to young Virginians – a decision for which I applaud our governor and general assembly – Cho reapplied to Virginia tech, won admission and he now is able to attend Virginia Tech where he will pursue a degree in business and hopefully participate in this great expansion of the Virginia economy that so many of our immigrants have been proud to lead.

For young people like Hareth and Cho, DACA makes sense. Both came here as young children. They didn't come here of their own volition, they were brought here. They only know Virginia as home and they seek to study, work and build a life in this country as proud Virginians. They want to return the opportunities afforded to them by using their talents to improve their communities and make it a better place for everybody.

In addition to this humanitarian aspect, as you've heard these talented students are the kinds of people who accelerate our economy, DACA is good for our economy too. So I strongly support its continuation but I also want to encourage my colleagues – and I think we all agree on this, democrat, republican, independent – we all agree this program works best not by executive order but by legislation. We are now almost exactly two years from the date when the Senate passed comprehensive immigration reform right here on this floor in June of 2013. Two years where after a strong bipartisan effort we’ve waited for action, any action, by the House not just taking up our bill, but their own bill, and in a conference finding a compromise, which we can do. It's time that the House act. It's time that the Senate and House sit down together and do comprehensive immigration reform.

We can give DREAMers and millions of other families who continue to live in the shadows an earned pathway to citizenship.

It's time to pass that reform.

It's in the best interest of our nation and in the best valued traditions of my Commonwealth that we do so. And with that, Mr. President, I yield the floor.

KAINE MARCA TERCER ANIVERSARIO DE DACA, PIDE APROBACION DE REFORMA MIGRATORIA INTEGRAL

WASHINGTON, D.C. –El Senador Tim Kaine discursó hoy en el pleno del Senado para marcar el tercer aniversario del Programa de Acción Diferida para los Llegados en la Infancia (DACA, por sus siglas en inglés) y pidió que sus colegas en el Congreso trabajen juntos para aprobar una reforma migratoria integral. Desde que el programa fue anunciado en el 2012, DACA ha ofrecido alivio migratorio temporal a más de 660,000 inmigrantes quienes llegaron a los Estados Unidos como niños, incluyendo a casi 10.000 quienes llaman Virginia su hogar. Kaine mencionó las historias de dos jóvenes de Virginia registrados en el programa DACA para demostrar que comunidades por todo el estado de Virginia se han beneficiado de las oportunidades económicas y educativas disponibles para estos jóvenes.

“El programa DACA anunciado por el Presidente ha permitido que estos jóvenes contribuyan a nuestras comunidades, vivan sin el constante miedo de ser deportados, ha mantenido unidas a las familias y proveído oportunidades económicas y educativas para estos jóvenes,” dijo Kaine. “[Los DREAMers] no llegaron aquí por su propia voluntad – fueron traídos aquí. Solamente conocen a Virginia como hogar y buscan estudiar, trabajar y construir vidas como orgullosos residentes de Virginia. Ellos quieren saldar su deuda por las oportunidades que ellos tuvieron al usar sus talentos para mejorar sus comunidades y crear mejores vidas para todos.”

“Estamos a casi dos años del día en que el Senado aprobó una reforma migratoria integral aquí en el pleno en junio del 2013,” continuó Kaine. “A dos años de que vimos un arduo esfuerzo bipartidista seguimos que la Cámara de Representantes actué. Que actué para considerar no sólo nuestra legislación, pero su propio proyecto de ley, y llegar a un acuerdo en conferencia, lo cual podríamos lograr. Es hora de que la Cámara de Representantes actúe. Es hora de que el Senado y la Cámara se sienten juntos y aprueben una reforma migratoria integral para que sea una realidad. Podemos darle a DREAMers y a millones de familias quienes siguen viviendo en las sombras un camino a la ciudadanía después de cumplir ciertos requisitos. Es hora de aprobar esa reforma.”

Transcripción completa del discurso de Kaine:

“Gracias, Sr. Presidente. Hoy me dirijo a ustedes para marcar el tercer aniversario del programa Acción Diferida para los Llegados en la Infancia, el cual se celebró esta semana. Desde el 2012, el programa que el Presidente implementó, ahora conocido como DACA, ha ofrecido alivio provisional a inmigrantes que llegaron a los Estados Unidos como niños y ha ayudado a casi 665.000 jóvenes desde junio del 2015, incluyendo a más de 10.000 en Virginia.

El programa DACA anunciado por el Presidente les ha permitido a estos jóvenes contribuir a nuestras comunidades, vivir sin el miedo constante de ser deportados, mantener unidas a las familias y proveer oportunidades económicas y educativas para estos jóvenes beneficiarios. Quiero agradecerle al Presidente Obama y a la administración porque DACA ha dado alivio a miles de jóvenes quienes solamente buscan la oportunidad, proveer para sus familias y contribuir al único lugar que conocen como hogar: los Estados Unidos.

Los inmigrantes no son los únicos que se benefician. DACA refuerza la reputación mundial de que en este país, nos sentimos orgullosos, que valoramos nuestro patrimonio de inmigrantes y celebramos sus contribuciones a la historia, industria y cultura americana. Sr. Presidente, este es un valor muy arraigado en Virginia y lo sentimos más cada día. Cuando yo nací en 1958, uno de cada cien virginianos había nacido en otro país. Hoy, en el 2015, uno de cada nueve virginianos nació en otro país. Este periodo coincide con una mejoría económica de Virginia, ya que la economía del estado avanzó del 25% más bajo al 25% más alto en cuanto a ingresos per cápita. La migración y las contribuciones a nuestro estado han sido tremendamente positivas. Hay más de 10.000 jóvenes en Virginia que se han beneficiado de DACA. Somos el 13er estado en el país.

Permítanme contarles dos historias cortas. Hareth Andrade ilustra lo que los recipientes de DACA – cuando tienen la oportunidad – pueden dar a sus comunidades. Hareth fue traída a los Estados Unidos desde Bolivia por adultos – ella llegó sin sus padres. Ella sobresalió en la escuela, estudió en Washington Lee High School, aquí en Arlington. Ella tomó cursos de Advanced Placement e International Baccalaureate. En una visita a una universidad antes de graduarse, ella se enteró que su estatus como indocumentada sería una barrera a conseguir una educación universitaria. Pero en vez de abandonar su sueño, ella fundó, junto con otros estudiantes, la organización Dreamers of Virginia dedicada a proveerles a estudiantes como ella acceso a colegiatura de residente estatal e ingreso a la universidad. Después de que el Presidente anunció el programa DACA en junio del 2012, Hareth se convirtió en una beneficiaria y desde entonces se cambió de un colegio comunitario a Trinity Washington University, donde espera graduarse de la carrera de relaciones internacionales.

Otro estudiante; una historia más: Jung Bin Cho también se ha abierto camino, gracias a DACA, en la gran institución de Virginia Tech, donde se está matriculado. Cho llegó a los Estados Unidos con sus padres desde Corea del Sur cuando tenía siete años. Él asistió a la primaria, se graduó de la preparatoria en Springfield, Virginia, y jugó en la línea defensiva de su equipo de fútbol americano. Su sueño, como el sueño de muchos en Virginia, era matricularse a Virginia Tech y ganó ingreso a la universidad. Pero en ese momento se dio cuenta que su estatus de indocumentado no le permitiría conseguir colegiatura de residente estatal ni ningún apoyo económico. A causa de no poder pagar la colegiatura, él asistió a un colegio comunitario y tuvo dos empleos para sostenerse. Pero después de DACA y la decisión el año pasado de ofrecer colegiatura estatal jóvenes virginianos – una decisión por la cual aplaudo al gobernador y la asamblea general – Cho solicitó de nuevo y volvió a ganar el ingreso y ahora puede asistir a Virginia Tech, donde él podrá completar la carrera en negocios y con suerte participar en esta gran expansión económica en Virginia de la que tantos inmigrantes se sienten orgullosos de liderar.

Para jóvenes como Hareth y Cho, DACA tiene sentido. Los dos llegaron aquí como niños. No llegaron aquí de su propia voluntad – fueron traídos aquí. Solamente conocen Virginia como hogar y buscan estudiar, trabajar y construir vidas como orgullosos residentes de Virginia. Ellos quieren que otros tomen ventaja de las oportunidades que ellos tuvieron al usar sus talentos para mejorar sus comunidades para todos.

Más allá del aspecto humanitario, usted ha escuchado como estos estudiantes talentosos son el tipo de personas que aceleran nuestra economía. DACA también beneficia a nuestra economía. Por esas razones apoyo firmemente su continuación pero también quiero animar a mis colegas – y creo que todos estamos de acuerdo con esto, demócratas, republicanos e independientes – todos estamos de acuerdo en que este programa funcionaría mejor, no como acción ejecutiva, sino como legislación. Ahora estamos a casi dos años del día en que el Senado aprobó la reforma migratoria integral, aquí mismo en esta cámara en junio del 2013. Dos años después de un gran esfuerzo bipartidista, seguimos esperando acción, cualquier movimiento, por parte de la Cámara de Representantes, no sólo en aprobar nuestra legislación, también su propia legislación y llegar a un acuerdo en conferencia, lo cual podemos lograr. Es hora de que la Cámara tome acción. Es hora de que el Senado y la Cámara trabajen juntos y hagan de la reforma migratoria integral una realidad.

Podemos darles a los DREAMers y a millones de otras familias que siguen viviendo en las sombras un camino a la ciudadanía después de cumplir ciertos requisitos.

Es hora de aprobar esa reforma.

Beneficia a nuestro país y los valores de mi estado que lo hagamos. Y con eso, Sr. Presidente, cedo la palabra.

###